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Dogs Elbow should come to chest.
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Dog should be rectangle rather than square
Correct
In Correct
A Crested's movement should be long, flowing and elegant with reach and drive...
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Using a picture of your dog we should be able to draw a triangle over the dog as seen to visualize proper leg position
The front reach of the dog should result in a front extension approximately below the nose.  The rear extension should balance the front with an equal kickback.  As you can see, the triangle’s apex is just above the point at which the front foot and rear foot exchange positions (about the center of the dog’s topline).  The angle that forms the front reach is about equal to the angle that forms the rear extension.  This is balanced movement and illustrates correct Chinese Crested side gait


Poor  Angulation shortens stride because the bones meeting at the shoulder joint
and hip are steeply set, forming joints with wide angels. Problems arise when one part
has to overwork or compensate for lack of balance.
It is important to stress
that too much angulation is detrimental to joint support and endurance!
Our standard clearly states

MODERATE ANGULATION

"It is never a question of more angulation is better!"

a dog with moderate angulation and balance will move smoothly, providing
strong thrust from its rear and spring and resilience from its front...

Dogs with poor angulation must take shorter steps and more of them to get where they are going.
This will create a BOUNCING MOVEMENT..


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About figure A
Dogs with no angulation to the rear will have no balance to their side movement..
We  seem to be seeing more and more of this in the ring.

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About figure B
It should be noted that dogs with NO ANGULATION in front or rear
may be better off than a dog lacking in balance!
Where one end has to compensate for the other.
A.
B.
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There are many possible deviations from the normal gait caused by either poor conformation
or conditioning.. Any deviation from a straight line column of bones during the entire swing of the limb is a FAULT!
It needs to be noted that there are no DQ's in the Chinese Crested
so a fault is just that a fault.

     The most commonly seen are
Crossing Over
Paddling
Toeing Out
Weaving

Looking at Top Lines
Picture showing a level top line which is clearly stated in our standard

Picture shows a level top line with a slightly sloping croup which is also stated in our standard
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Picture A and B showing  top lines that appears roached
A
B
Roach back:
A defect in conformation, which does not affect performance but is unattractive esthetically. The dorsal spinous processes of the caudal thoracic and lumbar vertebrae protrude excessively giving the animal a convex topline. Called also kyphosis
Looking at Rear Angulation
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The main function of the rear is to produce forward thrust, analagous to the engine of a sports car. The muscles attached to the femur, especially the biceps femoris, produce the most forward thrust. The bones of the femur and tibia, along with the hock joint and pastern act like a coil spring. As the dog coils backward increasing tension on the spring, the released energy is transmitted to the croup and then to the spine
Good rear Angulation
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A
B
Picture A and B show rear angulation problems..

Picture A shows not enough angulation ..there is not suffeciant bend to the stifle.
Picture B shows the other extreme..over angulation..cause piossiable legs to long - set to far behind dog ..possible sickle hocks
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Hocks should be set wide apart. However many Crested seem to have an issue with this.. And the standard makes no mention of the term Ruber hocks..

The rear assembly of the dog initiates all forward thrust.  This becomes obvious when watching any dog engage in  sports. From an anatomical perspective, the rear assembly houses the largest muscle group on the body and the thickest bones, the femur and tibia. These large bones attach to the croup and via the croup, (the croup acts as a fulcrum transmitting energy to the spine) forward movement is initiated. The front does not contain as many important elements for movement, therefore from a functional viewpoint; it is the lesser of the two. This does not diminish the front’s importance.
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Crabbing or sidewinding is a faulty forward movement in which the spinal column is not pointed
in the direction of travel, rather it deviates at an angle so that one rear leg passes on the inside of the front foot, while the other does so on the outside of its partner, instead of traveling in a straight line.
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Looking at Tails

Tails should  be set high and carried up or out when in motion. Long and tapering, fairly straight, NOT curled or twisted.. The bottom 2 pictures right..are incorrect..The first shows a curled tail ...the second a Tea Cup Tail..both are common in this breed both are incorrect..

Top Pictures show correct Tails..It should be noted that there seems to be a trend with AKC judges placing only "Happy Tails" up and wagging and ignoring the lovely correct breed type of  the "Flag Waving" out in movement...like the wind grabbing it..
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Pictures of Correct Tails
Tails should  be set high and carried up or out when in motion. Long and tapering, fairly straight..
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Pictures of InCorrect Tails
Curled and Tea Cup

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I want to stress that in my opinion judges are placing to much attention to the tail.... They are looking for tails to be carried high and wagging... cleaarly the STANDARD calls for carried up or out when in motion...
Teacup and curled are not correct even if wagging and should be judged as such.


Feet are hair feet or in many hairless extreme hair feet.

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Thank you for viewing this page and I hope it has helped the
new comer to better understand the structure of the Chinese Crested...Some of the drawlings used on this page were taken from the book "The Chinese Crested " by Brenda Jones...

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